These Women Know How To Make Pi

Things are really adding up for women in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) today. One contributing factor? The international celebration of Pi Day. But to add another variable to the mix, it’s also Women’s History Month. To honor this radical convergence of factors, I wanted to share a few prime quotes from some of my favorite women in STEM:

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Dr. Marie Maynard Daly overcame both racial and gender bias to pursue a career in chemistry. She was the first African-American woman to receive a Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1947. She was a strong advocate for minority student enrollment in medical and graduate science programs.

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Dr. Lydia Villa-Komaroff was the third Mexican American woman in the United States to receive a doctorate degree in sciences. She was later the lead author on a paper reporting synthesis of mammalian insulin in bacteria cells and has since been a university administrator, laboratory scientist and business woman.

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In 1992, Mae Jemison was one of six astronauts aboard the Endeavour on mission STS-47 and was the first African American woman to fly into space. Later, she practiced medicine abroad as a Peace Corps medical officer as well as at home in the U.S. 

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Computer scientist Dr. Grace Hopper used her background in mathematics to become one of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer in 1994. In 1952, Hopper and her team created the first compiler for computer languages (COBOL), now used around the world.

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In 2014, Dr. Maryam Mirzakhani became the first woman and first Iranian to win math’s highest honor, the Fields Medal. She has been recognized dozens of times for her work in mathematics. She currently works as a professor of mathematics at Stanford University.

In sum, we’re proud to celebrate the amazing contributions of these women to the STEM fields, and hope you’ll find these mathematical motivational Monday quotes proof that the strongest equation for our future is one that leaves no one in the remainder, especially not women in STEM.